Hockey Bet – Learn to Profit Betting on Hockey

Yes, you can make a profit by betting effectively on hockey. The secret to the perfect hockey bet? The spread betting system. Spread betting systems are sets of principles or schemes of ideas by which spread betting is organized. Spread betting, on the other hand, is a noun that means gambling that depends heavily on stock price movement. To elaborate, it is a form of gambling wherein you look at the stock price movement relative to a specific set of low and high values and place your bet accordingly. If the stock price moves outside the set figures on a particular day, you win. Your winnings will always be a multiple of your original stake multiplied by the figure representing the discrepancy between the actual stock price and the specified set of values given. This is the system of betting used when people wager on the exact points by which a team would win or lose in hockey games.

Sports Betting: Media's Growing Interest in Legalized Gambling - Variety

Knowing and understanding your hockey bet through being aware of spread betting systems is important when you want to make gambling on hockey games your business. However, it is not advised for beginners to jump into the pool of spread bettors right away 1xbet app login. There are other ways to win betting on hockey, such as by putting your bet on the money line or by wagering on the puck line. After all, betting over or under is a more difficult task. When you bet on the money line or the puck line, all you have to do is pick the team that, by careful analysis of different statistics, you think will win. The only difference between the two is with the money line, you just pick a team, but with the puck line, your chosen team has to win the game by a scoring a minimum of two puck hits to the goal. When you are betting over or under, or by means of spread betting, on the other hand, you have to give a prediction of the scores that each of the opposing teams are going to have by the end of the game. As previously mentioned, this type of betting is not advisable for beginners to participate in. By the time you try betting over or under, you have to already have a very good understanding of how teams play. Without one, you will not be able to accurately make a calculated guess on the points that they would have earned by the time the game has finished. Also, due to this level of difficulty, it is quite obvious that there is a higher risk of losing your money in spread betting. However, it is for this same reason that you earn more money betting over or under.

Simply a betting bank is the total number of units(i.e. £1) you have for betting. A unit is the amount of money you are betting per race\horse again for example £1 per bet. I generally like to keep a betting bank of around 30 units, if my unit of betting was £1 that would require a bank of £30, if my unit is £10 that requires at least £300 and if betting £100 per horse that would need £3,000. It is important that the money you start your betting bank with is money you can afford to lose. You must never use money that is required for your living costs. A betting bank helps you ride those periods where winners are few and far between. And secondly if your using money that you can afford to lose you are far more relaxed and confident in your selections, that is not too relaxed that you take unnecessary risks but relaxed in that you accept you will have losers, in fact most probably more losers than winners. Learning how to accept and deal with losing streaks is as important as finding winners.

If your stake is £1 per horse how do you reach the point at which you can bet £100 per horse without having to place £3,000 in your account or wait until you have accumulated 3,000 winning points. This is where the incremental betting bank comes in to force. Your winners and losers will be added and subtracted from your bank total, each time a significant point is reached in the total (using the assumption you are in profit). You divide your betting bank by the number of units you are using and that becomes your new unit per horse. For example. If starting with a bank of £30 with £1 per horse at the point the bank reaches £45 dividing the total by 30 gives a new unit of £1.50. Once the bank attains £60 then dividing by 30 gives £2 per selection. This continues until you reach the point at which you would wish to bet per unit, say £100 per bet. Then whenever your bank accumulates more than £3,000 you siphon that off as winnings and keep your bank at a steady amount. This whole process may seem daunting but to double your bank from £30 to £60 in order to double your bet is no more difficult than doubling from £1,500 to £3,000 in order to bet from £50 to £100.

One of the disadvantages of using a horse racing system (or any other sport) for your betting is that you cannot control the amount of bets that are going to be produced on any given day. As seen with the Avon Handicap System various filters can be applied to limit or extend the amount of bets. But even if using one of the filters a particular day such as Fridays where up to seven meetings are ongoing can create six, seven or more bets. Sods law will dictate that on such a day they all lose, this can make a dent in your betting bank and confidence. To mitigate this happening you can use the 10% or 3 point rule. This states that the maximum amount of money you commit from your betting bank is 10% or the maximum of 3 points. For example, if you have a betting total of 50 points and the total in cash is £500 (£10 per point) the maximum you use for that day is 10% or £50. If using 3 points the maximum would be 3 x £10 equals £30. If on that day there are 3 runners using the 3 point rule that would be £10 per bet, using 10% that would also be £10 as that is your 1 point(unit) amount so both totals would be £30. Remember the 10% is only a maximum. If there were 6 selections, betting at £10 per bet (£60), the total would be greater than the maximum allowed for both approaches. In this situation we divide the number of bets (6) into the maximum total for each method. So for the 3 point method 6 into 30 (£30) equals 5, that becomes £5 per bet. For the 10% method 6 divided into 50 (£50) equals 8.33 (lets say 8), so that becomes £8 per bet. I personally use the 3 point rule no matter what size bank unless I’m creating a new system and only use small amounts per bet (£1) in which case my betting bank is effectively 100 plus.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *